Cours d'allemand gratuitsCréer un test
Connectez-vous !

Cliquez ici pour vous connecter
Nouveau compte
4 millions de comptes créés

100% gratuit !
[Avantages]


- Accueil
- Accès rapides
- Imprimer
- Livre d'or
- Plan du site
- Recommander
- Signaler un bug
- Faire un lien



Recommandés :

- Jeux gratuits
- Nos autres sites

   



Rack Your Brains and Help/91

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains and Help/91
Message de here4u posté le 27-03-2021 à 19:43:02 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear Workers,

Here is my Student's call for HELP! I know you'll answer him...
THERE ARE 15 MISTAKES in this text. Please, correct them in CAPITAL LETTERS;


Today, as we fling the same old insults on social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really presses your buttons. At times like these, an historic dictionary can be your friend. Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly recognisable. «Mumpsimus» is a word that fills a such gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500-years-old epithet for someone who insists he’s true though clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not. The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who consistently stripped up while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE /// The prayer includes the line 'Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine' ('What we have reveived in the mouth, Lord'), but the priest substituted a non-existing word 'mumpsimus' for 'sumpsimus'. He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but consistently gave the stubborn response that 'I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus!'. Today’s potential applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to his old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader.
Next is the person who loves to talk in length on a subject they know almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous criticism is also known as «an ultracrepidarian»,/// END of PART TWO /// a term that has travelled across centuries thanks to a classical history of a man who dared to do comment on matters far beyond his area of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting of the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in the picture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist of commenting 'ultra crepidam' ('beyond the sandal'). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.

(2 new words ("swearwords" ) that you'll never use again! That's what real culture is...
Cet exercice est un et sa correction sera en ligne le lundi 12 avril, tard.

May THE FORCE be with You!


Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de maxwell, postée le 31-03-2021 à 18:40:10 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED

Hello Here4U
Thanks again. Though it was not an easy exercise with sentences I'm not sure I've understood thoroughly, I've found several mistakes, but certainly not all of them, and I wonder if I haven't corrected too much...
Help my student:
Today, as we fling the same old insults on social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really presses your buttons. At times like these, an HISTORICAL dictionary can be your friend. Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly recognisable. «Mumpsimus» is a word that fills [] such A gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500-YEAR-old epithet for someone who insists THEY'RE true though clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not. The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who consistently TRIPPED up while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE /// 
The prayer includes the line 'Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine' ('What we have RECEIVED in the mouth, Lord'), but the priest substituted a non-existing word 'mumpsimus' for 'sumpsimus'. He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but consistently gave the stubborn response that 'I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus!'. Today’s potential IMPLICATIONS, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to his old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader.
Next is the person who loves to talk AT length on a subject they know almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous criticism is also known as «an ultracrepidarian»,/// END of PART TWO /// a term that has travelled THROUGH centuries thanks to THE classical STORY of a man who dared to MAKE comment on matters far beyond his area of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting of the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in the picture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist  FROM commenting 'ultra crepidam' ('beyond the sandal'). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de taiji43, postée le 01-04-2021 à 17:32:20 (S | E)
Dear Here4U
Here is my correction
As usual it was a pleasant moment, hoping that I didn't forget too many mistakes or that I didn’t add any...
I wish you a pleasant Easter weekend ; as well as my friends from the forum .

Help my student:READY TO BE CORRECTED

Today, as we fling the same old insults AT social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really presses your buttons. At times like these, an HISTORICAL dictionary can be your friend. Here are two labels that are at least fivecenturies old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly recognisable. «Mumpsimus» is a word that fills such A gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500-YEAR -old epithet for someone who insists IT’s true though clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not. The term originated FROM a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who consistently stripped up while reciting the post-communion prayer END OF PART FIRST

The prayer includes the line 'Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine' ('What we have RECEIVE in the mouth, Lord')
He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but consistently gave the stubborn response that 'I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus!'. Today’s potential applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to THEIR old beliefs while REJECTING any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader.
Next is the person who loves to talk AT length on a subject they know almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous criticism is also known as «an ultracrepidarian»,/// END of PART TWO ///

A term that has travelled THROUGH centuries thanks to a classical STORY of a man who dared COMMENT (to comment = faire un commentaire) on matters far beyond his FIELD of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting of the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in la peinture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist FROM commenting 'ultra crepidam' ('beyond the sandal').
From here or THAT’S THE WAY (c’est ainsi), the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarian



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de here4u, postée le 07-04-2021 à 23:17:19 (S | E)
Hello!

I thought it was a pleasant subject... and had customized it for you!

You still have a few days to post your tries... Do not hesitate to enter the game!





Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de swan85, postée le 10-04-2021 à 21:03:48 (S | E)
Hello Here4U

Thank you
Here is what I tried to do. READY TO BE CORRECTED

Today, as we fling the same old insults on social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really presses your buttons.
At times like these, an HISTORICAL dictionary can be your friend.
Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly RECOGNIZABLE. «Mumpsimus» is a word that fills a such gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500- YEAR-old epithet for someone who insists IT’s true though clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not.
The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who CONSTANTLY TRIPPED up while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE ///
The prayer includes the line 'Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine' ('What we have RECEIVED in the mouth, Lord'), but the priest substituted a NONEXISTENT word 'mumpsimus' for 'sumpsimus'.
He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but CONSTANTLY gave the stubborn response that 'I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus!'.
Today’s potential applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to his old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader. Next is the person who loves to talk AT length on a subject HE KNOWS almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous criticism is also known as «an ultracrepidarian»,
/// END of PART TWO ///
a term that has travelled across centuries thanks to a classical history of a man who dared to DO comment on matters far beyond his area of expertise.
That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting of the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal ON the picture.
Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist FROM commenting 'ultra crepidam' ('beyond the sandal'). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de maya92, postée le 11-04-2021 à 17:04:36 (S | E)
Hello Here4u,

Today, as we fling the same old insults AT social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really presses your buttons. At times like these, A HISTORICAL dictionary can be your friend. Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly recognisable. «Mumpsimus» is a word that fills such A gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500-YEAR -old epithet for someone who insists he’s RIGHT though clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not. The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly(-)literate Catholic priest, who consistently SLIPPED up while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE ///
The prayer includes the line 'Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine' ('What we have received in the mouth, Lord'), but the priest substituted a non-existing word 'mumpsimus' for 'sumpsimus'. He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but consistently gave the stubborn response that 'I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus!'. Today’s potential applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to THEIR old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader. Next is the person who loves to talk in length on a subject they know almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous criticism is also known as «an ultracrepidarian»,/// END of PART TWO
/// a term that has travelled across (THROUGH) centuries thanks to THE classical STORY of a man who dared to do commentS (or to comment) on matters far beyond his area of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting of the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in the picture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist FROM commenting 'ultra crepidam' ('beyond the sandal'). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. WOULD you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.

Voilà, pas sûre du tout d'avoir trouvé 15 fautes but I did my best .. (traduc de la première partie prête si nécessaire)
Have a nice Sunday evening -



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de joe39, postée le 11-04-2021 à 17:42:13 (S | E)
Hello dear here4u,
Hello everyone
Here is my try, ready to be corrected
15 mistakes.

Today, as we fling the same old insults on social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really presses your buttons.
At times like these, an HISTORICAL dictionary can be your friend.
Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly RECOGNIZABLE. «Mumpsimus» is a word that fills a such gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500- YEAR-old epithet for someone who insists IT’s true though clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not.
The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who CONSTANTLY TRIPPED up while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE ///
The prayer includes the line 'Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine' ('What we have RECEIVED in the mouth, Lord'), but the priest substituted a NON-EXISTENT word 'mumpsimus' for 'sumpsimus'.
He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but CONSTANTLY gave the stubborn response that 'I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus!'.
Today’s potential applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to his old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader. Next is the person who loves to talk AT length on a subject HE KNOWS almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous criticism is also known as «an ultracrepidarian»,
/// END of PART TWO ///
a term that has travelled across centuries thanks to a classical history of a man who dared to DO comment on matters far beyond his area of expertise.
That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting of the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal ON the picture.
Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist FROM commenting 'ultra crepidam' ('beyond the sandal'). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.
Thanking you a lot I hope you have a great week.
So long
Joe39



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de alpiem, postée le 12-04-2021 à 11:59:45 (S | E)
Hello, dear Here, your note has made me feel good . I am missing you too! but A penalysing nervous healness is nibbling
my nerves,expressed by legs being straight ,shivering hands . Not very harmful but tedious and sapping. But SO don't be sorry
about my prep. I can't do better.

here is the version DEAR HERE 4U, I SEND THIS PART for you to know if I am to continue(click for the grammar)

Aujourd'hui,comme nous nous servons des mêmmes insultes surrannées dans les médias, il peut ètre difficile de trouver "le mot juste" pour quelqu'un qui vous met à bout.

De nos jours un dictionaire des racines peut vous sauver. Voilà deux expressions qui ont au moins cinq siècle, mais les personnes qu'elles visent sont encore reconnues instantanément ."Mumpsimus"est un mot qui remplit tellement bien un tel manque de notre langue, que vous pouvez vous demander comment vous avez pu vivre sans elle.

C'est un mot vieux de 500 ans qui décrit quelqu'un qui insiste qu' il est honnête , alors qu'il est clair et irréfutable qu'il ne l'est pas.
le terme vient d'une histoire bien connue d'un curé catholique peu lettré qui, chaque fois trébuchait pendant qu'il récitait la prière de communion.( I'm not a catholic) ///FIN DE la PARTIE 1///

-------------------
Modifié par alpiem le 15-04-2021 11:07





Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de here4u, postée le 12-04-2021 à 23:51:23 (S | E)
Hello!

Je HAIS les vacances, les confinements, couvre-feux et autres mesures déprimantes ... J'espère que vos "vacances" se passent bien et REMERCIE de tout coeur ceux qui ont pris le temps de se plonger dans cet exercice ...

Vos résultats ont été bons. Certains ont trouvé toutes les erreurs ! Bravo à vous et encore !

Today, as we fling the same old insults on social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really pushes (1) your buttons. At times like these, a historical dictionary (2) can be your friend. Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly recognisable. « Mumpsimus » is a word that fills such a gap (3) in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500-years-old epithet (4) for someone who insists they’re right (5) despite (6) clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not. The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who consistently tripped up (7) while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE/// The prayer includes the line ‘Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine’ (‘What we have re(veived= typo! Sorry!) in the mouth, Lord’), but the priest substituted a non-existent word (8) ‘mumpsimus’ for ‘sumpsimus’. He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but consistently gave the stubborn response that ‘I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus !’. Today’s potential (applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to their (9) old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader.
Next is the person who loves to talk at length (10) on a subject they know almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous critic (11) is also known as ‘an ultracrepidarian’,///END of PART TWO /// a term that has travelled across centuries thanks to a classical story (12) of a man who dared to pass comment (13) on matters far beyond his area of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting by (14) the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in the picture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist from commenting (15) ‘ultra crepidam’ (‘beyond the sandal’). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.


(1) presses your buttons: pushes your buttons: arouses or provokes a reaction in someone.
(2) an historic dictionary; 2 fautes dans ces trois mots … « history »/ « historic »/ « historical » : H aspiré=> a history/ a historic …/ a historical … Différence entre « historic » et « historical »: Historic describes something momentous or important in history. Historical simply describes something that belongs to an earlier period of history.
(3) that fills a such gap: mauvaise construction de «such»: such+ a/ an/ + nom=> such a gap
(4) It’s a 500-year(s-old epithet: adjectif composé. Comme tous les adjectifs (et leurs parties), il reste invariable. a 500-year-old epithet
(5) for someone who insists he’s true (vrai): someone= pronom indéfini, les reprises du pronom se font au pluriel. => for someone who insists they’re right (avoir raison).
(6) «though clear evidence»= bien que des preuves claires /// despite clear evidence= malgré des preuves claires …
(7) To trip up: stumble: trébucher. MAIS : to strip : Lien internet
C'était ENORME, non?
(8) a non-existing word: Lien internet

One thing is that the adjective exists so there's no need to cobble one together from a verb. The other thing is it can be bothering to think of "non-existing" as something continuous and/or active. It "refuses to exist over and over". : non-existent
(9) anyone who stubbornly sticks to their old beliefs - même remarque que (5)
(10) to talk at length: extensively, in detail/ after a long while.
(11) presumptuous critic; bien différencier a critic/ a criticism/ a critique.
Lien internet
: détracteur/ opposant/ critique d’art//// Lien internet
: une critique
Lien internet
: to criticise
(12) A story: l’histoire que l’on raconte … History= l’Histoire.
(13) who dared to do comment=> to pass comment
(14) A painting by an artist.
(15) desist of commenting: desist from commenting

Le Follow up Work attend des volontaires ... La première partie est assurée (2 fois !)... Il manque deux volontaires (parties 2 et 3) ... Je compte sur les bonnes volontés !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de taiji43, postée le 13-04-2021 à 11:52:36 (S | E)
bonjour Her4U


voici ma traduction de la partie 2

La prière comprend le vers "Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine" "Ce que nous avons reçu de la bouche du Seigneur mais le prêtre a substitué un mot inexistant "mumpsimus" à "sumpsimus". Il a été rapidement corrigé à plus d'une reprise, mais il a toujours donné obstinément la réponse suivante : "Je ne changerai pas mon ancien mumpsimus pour votre nouveau sumpsimus ! Les applications potentielles d'aujourd'hui, pour toute personne qui s'obstine à rester fidèle à ses anciennes croyances tout en rejetant toute preuve du contraire, sont certainement beaucoup plus vastes qu'on le croit.
Vient ensuite la personne qui aime parler longuement d'un sujet dont elle ne sait presque rien. Ce type de personne,beau parleur présomptueux est également connu sous le nom d'"ultracrépidarien ,



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de magie8, postée le 13-04-2021 à 13:12:13 (S | E)
bonjour je fais la 3e partie
a term that has travelled across centuries thanks to a classical story (12) of a man who dared to pass comment (13) on matters far beyond his area of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting by (14) the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in the picture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist from commenting (15) ‘ultra crepidam’ (‘beyond the sandal’). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.

un terme qui a traversé les siècles grâce à l'histoire d'un homme qui a osé faire des commentaires sur des sujets dépassant largement son domaine de compétences.Il s'agissait d'un cordonnier anonyme de la Grèce antique qui observant un tableau du célèbre artiste Appelles aurait critiqué le dessin d'une sandale dans cette oeuvre.Appelles qui aimait apparemment écouter ceux qui venaient voir ses toiles décida que le cordonnier devait s'en tenir à son propre métier et cesser de commenter"ultra crepidam"(au delà de la sandale).c'est ainsi qu'est né l'ultracrépidien.Si vous connaissez plus d'une personne de ce genre, les pluriels sont respectivement mumpsimuses ou mumpsimi et ultracrépidarian.

supra crepidam sutor iudicaret: un cordonnier ne devrait pas donner son avis au dessus de la chaussure
A cobbler should stick to his last: un cordonnier devrait s'en tenir à ce qu'il a à faire .
en français proverbial : chacun son métier , les vaches seront bien gardées



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de here4u, postée le 13-04-2021 à 15:01:12 (S | E)
Vous êtes formidables !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de alpiem, postée le 13-04-2021 à 17:54:35 (S | E)
hello here4u I wondered if you asked me for a thema or a version



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de here4u, postée le 13-04-2021 à 23:09:16 (S | E)
hello Alpiem!

Don't worry! You did part of the Follow up Work and the correction will come asap!

Good job!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains and Help/91 de here4u, postée le 15-04-2021 à 14:16:36 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends!

CORRECTION DU FOLLOW UP WORK;


Today, as we fling the same old insults on social media, it can be hard to find « the mot juste » for someone who really pushes your buttons. At times like these, a historical dictionary can be your friend. Here are two labels that are at least five centuries old, but the individuals they describe are still instantly recognisable. « Mumpsimus » is a word that fills such a gap in our language that you may wonder how you ever lived without it. It’s a 500-years-old epithet for someone who insists they’re right despite clear and incontrovertible evidence that they are not. The term originated in a much-told story about a poorly-literate Catholic priest, who consistently tripped up while reciting the post-communion prayer./// END of PART ONE///

Aujourd'hui, comme nous nous lançons les mêmes insultes surannées dans les média, il peut être difficile de trouver "le mot juste" lorsque quelqu'un vous pousse à bout.
De nos jours un dictionnaire des racines historique peut vous sauver. Voilà deux expressions qui ont au moins cinq siècle, mais les personnes qu'elles décrivent sont encore reconnues instantanément ."Mumpsimus" est un mot qui remplit tellement bien un tel manque de notre langue, que vous pouvez vous demander comment vous avez pu vivre sans lui.
C'est un mot vieux de 500 ans qui décrit quelqu'un qui insiste qu'il a raison , alors qu'il est clair et irréfutable qu'il ne l'est pas.
Le terme vient d'une histoire bien connue d'un curé catholique peu lettré qui, chaque fois butait sur le mot lorsqu'il récitait la prière de communion.
Bravo alpiem ! Texte bien compris !

Maya, we expect your translation too!

The prayer includes the line ‘Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine’ (‘What we have received in the mouth, Lord’), but the priest substituted a non-existent word ‘mumpsimus’ for ‘sumpsimus’. He was swiftly corrected on more than one occasion, but consistently gave the stubborn response that ‘I will not change my old mumpsimus for your new sumpsimus !’. Today’s potential applications, for anyone who stubbornly sticks to their old beliefs while dismissing any evidence to the contrary, are surely much broader.
Next is the person who loves to talk at length on a subject they know almost nothing about. This kind of presumptuous critic is also known as ‘an ultracrepidarian’,

La prière comprend le vers "Quod ore sumpsimus, Domine" "Ce que nous avons reçu dans la bouche, Seigneur!" mais le prêtre a substitué un mot inexistant "mumpsimus" à "sumpsimus". Il a été rapidement corrigé à plus d'une reprise, mais il a toujours donné obstinément la réponse suivante : "Je ne changerai pas mon ancien "mumpsimus" pour votre nouveau "sumpsimus" ! Les applications potentielles d'aujourd'hui, lorsque qu'une personne qui s'obstine à rester fidèle à ses anciennes croyances tout en rejetant toute preuve du contraire, sont certainement beaucoup plus vastes qu'on le croit.
Vient ensuite la personne qui aime parler longuement d'un sujet dont elle ne sait presque rien. Ce type de personne, beau parleur présomptueux est également connu sous le nom d'"ultracrépidarien" ,
Texte bien compris, bien traduit! Bravo,Taiji !

a term that has travelled across centuries thanks to a classical story of a man who dared to pass comment on matters far beyond his area of expertise. That man was an unnamed cobbler from Ancient Greece, who, while observing a painting by the renowned artist Apelles, allegedly criticised the rendering of a sandal in the picture. Apelles, who apparently liked to eavesdrop on those who came to see his paintings, decided that the cobbler should stick to his own trade and desist from commenting ‘ultra crepidam’ (‘beyond the sandal’). From here, the ultracrepidarian was born. Should you know more than one of these kinds of people, the plurals are, respectively, mumpsimuses or mumpsimi, and ultracrepidarians.

terme qui a traversé les siècles grâce à l'histoire d'un homme qui a osé faire des commentaires sur des sujets dépassant largement son domaine de compétences. Il s'agissait d'un cordonnier anonyme de la Grèce antique qui observant un tableau du célèbre artiste Appelles aurait critiqué le dessin d'une sandale dans cette oeuvre. Appelles qui aimait apparemment espionner ceux qui venaient voir ses toiles, décida que le cordonnier devait s'en tenir à son propre métier et cesser de commenter "ultra crepidam"(au delà de la sandale). C'est ainsi qu'est né l'ultracrépidien. Si vous connaissez plus d'une personne de ce genre, les pluriels sont respectivement "mumpsimuses" ou "mumpsimi" et "ultracrépidarian".

supra crepidam sutor iudicaret: un cordonnier ne devrait pas donner son avis au dessus de la chaussure
A cobbler should stick to his last: un cordonnier devrait s'en tenir à ce qu'il a à faire .
en français proverbial : chacun son métier, les vaches seront bien gardées
Très satisfaisant, Magie! Bravo

Un grand BRAVO à tous et un complémentaire à nos volontaires.




[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum

Partager : Facebook / Twitter / ... 


> INDISPENSABLES : TESTEZ VOTRE NIVEAU | GUIDE DE TRAVAIL | NOS MEILLEURES FICHES | Les fiches les plus populaires | Aide/Contact

> COURS ET TESTS : Abréviations | Accents | Accords | Adjectifs | Adverbes | Alphabet | Animaux | Argent | Argot | Articles | Audio | Auxiliaires | Chanson | Communication | Comparatifs/Superlatifs | Composés | Conditionnel | Confusions | Conjonctions | Connecteurs | Contes | Contraires | Corps | Couleurs | Courrier | Cours | Dates | Dialogues | Dictées | Décrire | Démonstratifs | Ecole | Etre | Exclamations | Famille | Faux amis | Films | Formation | Futur | Fêtes | Genre | Goûts | Grammaire | Guide | Géographie | Heure | Homonymes | Impersonnel | Infinitif | Internet | Inversion | Jeux | Journaux | Lettre manquante | Littérature | Magasin | Maison | Majuscules | Maladies | Mots | Mouvement | Musique | Mélanges | Méthodologie | Métiers | Météo | Nature | Nombres | Noms | Nourriture | Négations | Opinion | Ordres | Participes | Particules | Passif | Passé | Pays | Pluriel | Politesse | Ponctuation | Possession | Poèmes | Pronominaux | Pronoms | Prononciation | Proverbes | Prépositions | Présent | Présenter | Quantité | Question | Relatives | Sports | Style direct | Subjonctif | Subordonnées | Synonymes | Temps | Tests de niveau | Tous les tests | Traductions | Travail | Téléphone | Vidéo | Vie quotidienne | Villes | Voitures | Voyages | Vêtements


> INFORMATIONS : Copyright - En savoir plus, Aide, Contactez-nous [Conditions d'utilisation] [Conseils de sécurité] Reproductions et traductions interdites sur tout support (voir conditions) | Contenu des sites déposé chaque semaine chez un huissier de justice | Mentions légales / Vie privée | Cookies.
| Cours et exercices d'espagnol 100% gratuits, hors abonnement internet auprès d'un fournisseur d'accès.