Cours d'allemand gratuitsCréer un test
Connectez-vous !

Cliquez ici pour vous connecter
Nouveau compte
4 millions de comptes créés

100% gratuit !
[Avantages]


- Accueil
- Accès rapides
- Imprimer
- Livre d'or
- Plan du site
- Recommander
- Signaler un bug
- Faire un lien



Recommandés :

- Jeux gratuits
- Nos autres sites

   



Rack Your Brains/98

Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum || En bas

[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Rack Your Brains/98
Message de here4u posté le 11-07-2021 à 22:11:16 (S | E | F)
Hello, dear Friends...

Voici de quoi ne pas trop vous endormir pendant ces "vacances" ... J'espère que vous serez nombreux à aider mon "pauvre élève" qui vous demande de trouver les fautes qu'il a laissées, involontairement, bien sûr ...

Please, Help my poor Student! He needs you... This text contains 13 mistakes.(to be corrected in CAPITAL LETTERS, please )

We all come to the world with this idea that time is just a river that’s flown forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending of how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing process signals at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clapping his hands, it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means is the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s as if there’s a buffer where it looks for other signals coming up the pipeline and as a result it means that we’re all living a little bit in the past. What we think is happening right now will actually transpire some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of about half a second ago. ///END of Part ONE ///
If I show you a photograph for half a second on the screen and then I, show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you, a different photograph of the same amount of time, it will seem as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s novel, it has to burn more energy to represent it because it wouldn’t expect that. This feeling that things are going in a slow motion is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it lays down memories on what amounts to a secondary memory track, these are very dense memories. And you’re noticing everything around you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of memory there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that it must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an explication for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.///END of Part TWO/// It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of memory, and when you look back in the end of a year, you have a lot of memory of what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back in the end of the year, you’re probably doing approximately the same stuff you did for the X number of previous years. It seems as if the year just went back in a flash. Really the way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your watchwrist on your other hand or brushing your teeth with the other hand. Something this simple just forces the brain into a new mode where it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What that means is when you go to bed in night time you have a lot of footage to draw on and it feels as if your life is lasting longer. ///End of the extract///

Comme toujours, les parties servent à délimiter le travail de Follow up Work qui suivra la correction collective.
Cet exercice est un La correction sera en ligne le mardi 27 juillet 2021.
You may need THE FORCE! Here it is!


Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de taiji43, postée le 17-07-2021 à 15:27:54 (S | E)
Dear Here4U here4U

here,is my correction with all my dictionaries and my computer .It is much pleasant

READY TO BE CORRECTED

We all come to the world with this idea that time is just a river that’s FLOWING forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending ON how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing process signals at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clappingTHEIR hands, it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means is the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s AS THOUGH there’s a buffer where it looks for other signals coming INTO the pipeline and as a result or therefore it means that we’re all living a little bit in the past. What we think is happening right now HAS actually TRANSPIRING some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of about half a second ago. ///END of Part ONE ///

If I show you a photograph for half a second on the screen and then I, show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you, a different photograph FOR the same amount of time, it will seem as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s NEW , it has to burn more energy to represent it because it WASN’T EXPECTING that. This feeling that things are going in a slow motion is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it lays down memories on what amounts to a secondary memory track, these are very dense memories. And you’re noticing everything around you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of MEMORIES there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that it must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an explication for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.///END of Part TWO///

It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of MEMORIES and when you look back in the end of a year, you have a lot of MEMORIES what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back in the end of the year, you’re probably doing approximately the same stuff you did for the X number of previous years. It seems AS THOUGH the year just went back in a flash. Really the way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your WRISTWATCH (bracelet montre) on your other hand or brushing your teeth with the other hand. Something this simple just forces the brain into a new mode where it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What that means is when you go to bed in night time you have a lot of footage to draw on???or UPON and it feels as THOUGH your life is lasting longer. ///End of the extract///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de maxwell, postée le 18-07-2021 à 20:35:09 (S | E)
READY TO BE CORRECTED


Hello Here4U
And thanks a lot for this extremely interesting subject! I really loved it!
However, as you'll see, I didn't find all the mistakes. The level was too high for me. Therefore, I'll learn many things

We all come to the world with this idea that time is just a river that IS FLOWING forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending ON how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing process signals at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clapping THEIR hands, it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means isv THAT the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s as if there WERE a buffer where it looks for other signals coming up the pipeline and as a result it means that we’re all living a little [] in the past. What we think is happening right now will actually transpire some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of about half a second ago. ///END of Part ONE ///

If I show you a photograph for half a second on the screen and then I show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you a different photograph FOR the same amount of time, it SEEMS as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s novel, it has to burn more energy to represent it because it DIDN'T expect that.


This feeling that things are going in a slow motion is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it lays down memories on what amounts to a secondary memory track, these are very dense memories. And you’re noticing everything around you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of memory there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that it must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an EXPLANATION for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.///END of Part TWO///

It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of memory, and when you look back AT the end of a year, you have a lot of memory of what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back AT the end of the year, you’VE probably DONE approximately the same stuff THAN you did for the X number of previous years. It seems as if the year just went back in a flash. Really the way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your WRISTWATCH on your other hand or brushing your teeth with the other hand. Something THAT simple just forces the brain into a new mode where it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What THIS means is THAT when you go to bed AT night time you have a lot of footage to draw on and it feels as if your life is lasting longer. ///End of the extract///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de susu52, postée le 20-07-2021 à 10:53:49 (S | E)
Hi everyone, this was hard but interesting !
Here' s my try !


We all come INTO the world with this idea that time is just a river that’s flown forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending ON how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing processES SIGNAL at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clapping ONE'S hands, it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means is the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s as if there’s a buffer where it looks for other signals coming up the pipeline and as a result it means that we’re all living a little bit in the past. What we think is happening right now will actually transpire some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of AROUND half a second ago. ///END of Part ONE ///
If I show you a photograph DURING half a second on the screen and then, I (virgule devant I) show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you, a different photograph FOR the same amount of time, it will seem as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s NEW, it has to burn more energy to represent it because it DIDn’t expect that. This feeling that things are going in a slow motion is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it lays down memories on what amounts to a secondary memory track, these are very dense memories. And you’re noticing everything around you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of memory there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that it must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an EXPLANATION for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.///END of Part TWO/// It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of memory, and when you look back in the end of a year, you have a lot of memory of what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back in the end of the year, you’re probably doing approximately the same stuff you did for the X number of previous years. It seems as if the year just went back in a flash. The way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to REALLY seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your watchwrist on your other hand or brushing your teeth with the other hand. Something this simple just forces the brain into a new mode IN WHICH it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What that means is when you go to bed AT night time you have a lot of footage to draw on and it feels as if your life is lasting longer. ///End of the extract///



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de here4u, postée le 22-07-2021 à 13:32:25 (S | E)
Hum hum... Wakey wakey...

It's time for work...

Je commence à poster les corrections individuelles dès aujourd'hui ... Il vous reste encore quelques jours pour poster vos travaux ! N'hésitez pas !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de here4u, postée le 27-07-2021 à 23:35:46 (S | E)
Hello, dear Friends!

I do hate holidays, the moment when we have no time to do what we are used to doing... Thanks a lot to the faithful workers who've worked, anyway...


We all come into (1) the world with this idea that time is just a river that’s flowing (2) forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending on (3) how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing process signals at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clapping their hands (4), it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means is the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s as if there’s a buffer where it looks for other signals coming up the pipeline and as a result it means that we’re all living a little bit in the past. What we think is happening right now has actually transpired (5) some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of about half a second ago.///END of Part ONE ///
If I show you a photograph for half a second on the screen and then I, show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you, a different photograph for (6) the same amount of time, it will seem as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s novel, it has to burn more energy to represent it because it wasn’t expecting that.(7) This feeling that things are going in slow motion (8) is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it lays down memories on what amounts to a secondary memory track, these are very dense memories. And you’re noticing everything around you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of memory there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an explanation (9) for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.///END of Part TWO /// It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of memory, and when you look back in the (10) end of a year, you have a lot of memory of what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back in the end (10) of the year, you’re probably doing approximately the same stuff you’ve been doing (11) for the X number of previous years. It seems as if the year just went back in a flash. Really the way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your wristwatch(12) on your other hand or brushing your teeth with your other hand(4bis). Something this simple just forces the brain into a new mode where it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What that means is when you go to bed at night time (10) you have a lot of footage to draw upon(13 ) and it feels as if your life is lasting longer. ///End of the extract///


(NB. Since I've worked on this text, I've tried to have "novelty" in my life, following the writer's tip. I've changed sides of wristwatch several times, making sure my brains go on working even during the summer days and thus stay younger...)

(1) "We all come into the world": venir au monde : be born/ come into the world/ come into being/ come into existence/ ce qui implique une entrée dans le monde (IN) et un mouvement (to)=> INTO.
(2) a river that’s flowing : to flow est un verbe régulier=> "flowed/ was flowing". Ne pas confondre avec To fly, I flew, flown: voler.
(3) depending on: to depend ON: dépendre de
(4) somebody clapping their hands : "somebody", pronom indéfini. S’il y a une reprise du pronom, il sera repris au pluriel. C’est obligatoire. Ne pas oublier non plus l’adjectif possessif devant les parties du corps en anglais.
(5) "has actually transpired in the past": bilan d’action. Le futur était impensable et impossible.
(6) for the same (amount of) time: durée exprimée par FOR. Lien internet

(7) it wasn’t expecting that: attention à la concordance de temps …Le conditionnel était impossible ici.
(8) in slow motion: au ralenti (indénombrable ici).
(9) "offers an explication: an explanation (noun)"; le verbe est «to explain».
(10) in the end of the year: le texte donnait bien IN, mais après réflexion, j’aurais aussi pu (dû ?) accepter AT the end of the year.
En revanche, AT NIGHT/ at night time n’a pas d’alternative possible.
(11) the same stuff you did for the X number of previous years: ici, le prétérit ne se justifiait pas. Une durée ,(the X number of previous years) qui se poursuit dans le présent : indication pour le present perfect : the same stuff you’ve been doing…
(12) your wristwatch : attention ! Le nom composé était formé à l’envers. Toujours commencer par le dernier nom.
(4 bis) with your other hand : adjectif possessif obligatoire devant les parties du corps en anglais … mais pas en français !
(13) footage to draw on : Lien internet
: => « …of footage to draw upon… » s’inspirer était beaucoup plus clair.

Of course, we need volunteers for the Follow Up Work! I congratulate and thank you very much for the work done and for the work to come!



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de maxwell, postée le 28-07-2021 à 08:00:31 (S | E)
Hello!
Je traduirai la 1ère partie, mais d'abord, je regarde mes fautes
FINISHED
Part I:

We all come into the world with this idea that time is just a river that’s flowing forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending on how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing process signals at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clapping their hands, it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means is the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s as if there’s a buffer where it looks for other signals coming up the pipeline and as a result it means that we’re all living a little bit in the past. What we think is happening right now has actually transpired some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of about half a second ago.

Nous venons tous au monde avec cette idée que le temps n'est qu'une rivière qui s'écoule dans une direction à une vitesse fixe, mais ce que nous savons, c'est qu'il peut être différent dans votre esprit et dans le mien en fonction de la manière dont nous ressentons le temps parce que, d'une certaine façon, il s'agit d'une construction psychologique. En d'autres termes, le cerveau est enfermé dans l'obscurité et le silence à l'intérieur de la voûte crânienne et son travail est de déterminer ce qui se passe à l'extérieur. Votre vision et votre audition traitent des signaux à différentes vitesses, cependant, quand vous voyez quelque chose comme un ballon éclater ou quelqu'un frapper des mains, il semble que la vue et le son soient synchronisés. Cela signifie que le cerveau doit collecter toutes les informations avant de composer une histoire finale et de la servir à votre perception consciente. C'est comme s'il y avait une mémoire tampon où il recherche d'autres signaux se présentant du canal et par conséquent, cela signifie que nous vivons tous un peu dans le passé. Ce que nous croyons arriver en ce moment précis s'est produit à un moment donné dans le passé, probablement il y a environ une demi-seconde.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de magie8, postée le 28-07-2021 à 10:29:26 (S | E)
hello dears
la traduction de la 2e partie

If I show you a photograph for half a second on the screen and then I, show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you, a different photograph for (6) the same amount of time, it will seem as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s novel, it has to burn more energy to represent it because it wasn’t expecting that.(7) This feeling that things are going in slow motion (8) is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it ; not taking things too lightly you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of memory there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an explanation (9) for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.///END of Part TWO ///

Si je vous montre une photographie pendant une demi-seconde sur l'écran et puis je, vous la montre encore, et puis encore et encore, et encore. Et maintenant je vous montre, une photo différente durant le même laps de temps, il semblera que la nouvelle photo, étrange, reste plus longtemps sur l'écran. Principalement quand le cerveau voit quelque chose de nouveau, il doit brûler plus d'énergie pour le représenter parce- qu'il ne s'y attendait pas. Ce sentiment que les choses vont plus lentement c'est une astuce de votre mémoire. En d'autres mots, quand vous êtes en situation d'urgence, une partie de votre cerveau vient en ligne, c'est votre centre de contrôle d'urgences; il ; ne prends pas les choses à la légère en vous décryptant tout cela. Quand le cerveau retourne dans le passé, il y a une telle densité de mémoire là, que la seule conclusion du cerveau c'est que cela doit avoir pris beaucoup de temps.
Je pense que cela donne une explication du fait que dans l'esprit des gens, le temps semble s'accélérer en vieillissant.

bon à corriger merci here4u bon courage




Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de here4u, postée le 28-07-2021 à 10:50:08 (S | E)
Hello!

aux deux volontaires ! Il m'en faut encore un(e)



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de chocolatcitron, postée le 29-07-2021 à 22:05:28 (S | E)
Hello my Dear Here4u!❤️💪Hi Everybody!
J'ai entendu ton appel lointain : transmission de pensée. ❤️ Je traduis la troisième partie.❤️
END of Part TWO /// It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of memory, and when you look back in the (10) end of a year, you have a lot of memory of what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back in the end (10) of the year, you’re probably doing approximately the same stuff you’ve been doing (11) for the X number of previous years. It seems as if the year just went back in a flash. Really the way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your wristwatch(12) on your other hand or brushing your teeth with your other hand(4bis). Something this simple just forces the brain into a new mode where it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What that means is when you go to bed at night time (10) you have a lot of footage to draw upon(13 ) and it feels as if your life is lasting longer. ///End of the extract///

C'est parce que lorsque vous êtes un enfant, tout est nouveau pour vous. Vous êtes en train d'apprendre les lois qui régissent le monde, vous enregistrez beaucoup de choses dans votre mémoire, et lorsque vous faites le bilan de fin d'année, vous cumulez de nombreux souvenirs de vos apprentissages. Mais quand vous vieillissez et que vous faites le bilan de fin d'année, vous avez probablement fait la même chose que vous faisiez déjà depuis les X années précédentes. Il vous semble que l'année a défilé plus rapidement.
Vraiment la meilleure façon de modifier votre perception du temps est de chercher la nouveauté. Commencez par quelque chose de simple comme mettre votre montre-bracelet sur votre poignet inhabituel ou vous brosser les dents de l'autre main. Ce simple changement oblige le cerveau à travailler dans un nouveau mode où il ne peut pas prédire exactement ce qui va se passer (= débrayer en mode non-automatique*), mais doit plutôt être en alerte. Ce que cela signifie, c’est que lorsque vous vous couchez la nuit, vous avez beaucoup d’images sur lesquelles vous inspirer et vous avez l’impression que votre vie dure plus longtemps.

* terme photographique quand on choisit soi-même tous les réglages de l'appareil, sans se fier aux données du posomètre, pour une image plus originale mais pas forcément mieux réussie .
Merci Here4u ! (J'ai autocorrigé en bleu mon test... )
Take care of yourselves wherever you go and whatever you do, all of You. See you soon.



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de here4u, postée le 02-08-2021 à 13:36:43 (S | E)
Choco d'être un peu "mentaliste" ...
Je n'ai pas oublié votre Follow Up Work, mais il demande des "conditions de réception" que je n'avais pas ... Merci de votre patience !



Réponse : Rack Your Brains/98 de here4u, postée le 02-08-2021 à 14:20:13 (S | E)
hello, Dears!

Voici la correction de votre Follow Up Work! Bravo et merci à tous ! s

We all come into the world with this idea that time is just a river that’s flowing forward in one direction at a fixed speed, but what we know is that it can be different in your head and in my head, depending on how we perceive time, because time is somehow a psychological construction. In other words, your brain is locked in silence and darkness inside the vault of your skull and its job is to figure out what’s happening outside. Your vision and hearing process signals at different speeds, yet when you see something like a balloon pop or somebody clapping their hands, it appears as though the sight and sound are synchronised. What that means is the brain has to be collecting all the information before it puts together a final story and serves that up to your conscious perception. It’s as if there’s a buffer where it looks for other signals coming up the pipeline and as a result it means that we’re all living a little bit in the past. What we think is happening right now has actually transpired some time in the past, probably in the ballpark of about half a second ago.

1) Nous venons tous au monde avec cette idée que le temps n'est qu'une rivière qui s'écoule dans une direction à une vitesse fixe, mais ce que nous savons, c'est qu'il peut être différent dans votre esprit et dans le mien en fonction de la manière dont nous ressentons le temps parce que, d'une certaine façon, il s'agit d'une construction psychologique. En d'autres termes, le cerveau est enfermé dans l'obscurité et le silence à l'intérieur de la voûte crânienne et son travail est de déterminer ce qui se passe à l'extérieur. Votre vision et votre audition traitent des signaux à différentes vitesses, cependant, quand vous voyez quelque chose comme un ballon éclater ou quelqu'un frapper des mains, il semble que la vue et le son soient synchronisés. Cela signifie que le cerveau doit collecter toutes les informations avant de composer une histoire finale et de la servir à votre perception consciente. C'est comme s'il y avait une mémoire tampon où il recherche d'autres signaux se présentant du canal et par conséquent, cela signifie que nous vivons tous un peu dans le passé. Ce que nous croyons arriver en ce moment précis s'est produit à un moment donné dans le passé, probablement il y a environ une demi-seconde. Bravo, Maxwell ! C'est parfait !

If I show you a photograph for half a second on the screen and then I, show you that same photograph again, and then again and again, and again. And now I show you, a different photograph for the same amount of time, it will seem as though the new photograph, the oddball, stays on the screen for a much longer time. Essentially when the brain sees something that’s novel, it has to burn more energy to represent it because it wasn’t expecting that. This feeling that things are going in slow motion is a trick of memory. In other words, when you’re in an emergency situation a part of the brain comes online, this is your emergency control centre, it lays down memories on what amounts to a secondary memory track, these are very dense memories. And you’re noticing everything around you and writing it all down. When the brain reads that back out, there’s such a density of memory there, that the brain’s only conclusion is that must have taken a long time.
I think that offers an explanation for why people think that time seems to speed up as they grow older.

2)Si je vous montre une photographie pendant une demi-seconde sur l'écran et puis je vous la montre encore, et puis encore et encore, et encore. Et maintenant je vous montre, une photo différente durant le même laps de temps, il semblera que la nouvelle photo, "l'intrus", reste plus longtemps sur l'écran. Fondamentalement quand le cerveau voit quelque chose de nouveau, il doit brûler plus d'énergie pour le représenter parce - qu'il ne s'y attendait pas. Ce sentiment que les choses vont plus lentement est une astuce de notre mémoire. En d'autres mots, quand vous êtes en situation d'urgence, une partie de votre cerveau se connecte, c'est votre centre de contrôle d'urgence, il vous représente ce qui revient à une mémoire secondaire , des souvenirs très denses. Vous notez tout autour de vous, et enregistrez tout. Quand le cerveau retourne dans le passé, il y a une telle densité de mémoire là, que la seule conclusion du cerveau c'est que cela doit avoir pris beaucoup de temps.
Je pense que cela donne une explication au fait que dans l'esprit des gens, le temps semble s'accélérer en vieillissant.

Très bien, Magie ... Bravo ! Tu as eu du mérite, car j'avais mal collé la correction et ai dû travailler sur trois écrans différents pour m'y retrouver ...


It’s because when you’re a child, everything’s new to you. You’re figuring out the rules of the world, you’re writing down a lot of memory, and when you look back in the end of a year, you have a lot of memory of what you’ve learnt. But when you’re much older and you look back in the end of the year, you’re probably doing approximately the same stuff you’ve been doing for the X number of previous years. It seems as if the year just went back in a flash. Really the way to feel as though you’ve lived longer is to seek novelty. You can start with something simple like putting your wristwatch on your other hand or brushing your teeth with your other hand. Something this simple just forces the brain into a new mode where it can’t predict exactly what’s going to happen but instead has to be engaged. What that means is when you go to bed at night time you have a lot of footage to draw upon and it feels as if your life is lasting longer.

3)C'est parce que lorsque vous êtes un enfant, tout est nouveau pour vous. Vous êtes en train d'apprendre les lois qui régissent le monde, vous enregistrez beaucoup de choses dans votre mémoire, et lorsque vous faites le bilan en fin d'année, vous cumulez de nombreux souvenirs de vos apprentissages. Mais quand vous vieillissez et que vous faites le bilan de fin d'année, vous avez probablement fait la même chose que vous faisiez déjà depuis les X années précédentes. Il vous semble que l'année a défilé plus rapidement.
Vraiment la meilleure façon de modifier votre perception du temps est de rechercher la nouveauté. Commencez par quelque chose de simple comme mettre votre montre-bracelet sur votre poignet inhabituel ou vous brosser les dents de l'autre main. Ce simple changement oblige le cerveau à travailler dans un nouveau mode où il ne peut pas prévoir exactement ce qui va se passer, mais doit plutôt être en alerte. Ce que cela signifie, c’est que lorsque vous vous couchez la nuit, vous avez beaucoup d’images sur lesquelles vous inspirer et vous avez l’impression que votre vie dure plus longtemps.
Bravo, Choco ! C'est parfait !

Bravo et Merci à nos volontaires !




[POSTER UNE NOUVELLE REPONSE] [Suivre ce sujet]


Cours gratuits > Forum > Exercices du forum

Partager : Facebook / Twitter / ... 


> INDISPENSABLES : TESTEZ VOTRE NIVEAU | GUIDE DE TRAVAIL | NOS MEILLEURES FICHES | Les fiches les plus populaires | Aide/Contact

> COURS ET TESTS : Abréviations | Accents | Accords | Adjectifs | Adverbes | Alphabet | Animaux | Argent | Argot | Articles | Audio | Auxiliaires | Chanson | Communication | Comparatifs/Superlatifs | Composés | Conditionnel | Confusions | Conjonctions | Connecteurs | Contes | Contraires | Corps | Couleurs | Courrier | Cours | Dates | Dialogues | Dictées | Décrire | Démonstratifs | Ecole | Etre | Exclamations | Famille | Faux amis | Films | Formation | Futur | Fêtes | Genre | Goûts | Grammaire | Guide | Géographie | Heure | Homonymes | Impersonnel | Infinitif | Internet | Inversion | Jeux | Journaux | Lettre manquante | Littérature | Magasin | Maison | Majuscules | Maladies | Mots | Mouvement | Musique | Mélanges | Méthodologie | Métiers | Météo | Nature | Nombres | Noms | Nourriture | Négations | Opinion | Ordres | Participes | Particules | Passif | Passé | Pays | Pluriel | Politesse | Ponctuation | Possession | Poèmes | Pronominaux | Pronoms | Prononciation | Proverbes | Prépositions | Présent | Présenter | Quantité | Question | Relatives | Sports | Style direct | Subjonctif | Subordonnées | Synonymes | Temps | Tests de niveau | Tous les tests | Traductions | Travail | Téléphone | Vidéo | Vie quotidienne | Villes | Voitures | Voyages | Vêtements


> INFORMATIONS : Copyright - En savoir plus, Aide, Contactez-nous [Conditions d'utilisation] [Conseils de sécurité] Reproductions et traductions interdites sur tout support (voir conditions) | Contenu des sites déposé chaque semaine chez un huissier de justice | Mentions légales / Vie privée | Cookies.
| Cours et exercices d'espagnol 100% gratuits, hors abonnement internet auprès d'un fournisseur d'accès.